thatsonofamitch:

carlochian:

This worries me like what else am I supposed to do with them

fuck them. fuck the pringles. put your dick in the tube

thatsonofamitch:

carlochian:

This worries me like what else am I supposed to do with them

fuck them. fuck the pringles. put your dick in the tube

(via ragged-insomnia)


wherethewildbooksare:


So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 


Very interesting take on it. I really hope that comes through in the movie.

Edit: Also, you can love a book and still criticise it, dislike aspects of it or get annoyed by characters in it. I don’t like this scene much, but my ‘claim’ about loving the book isn’t any less valid. Plus, people can change their minds. So, yeah, keep that in mind.

wherethewildbooksare:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

Very interesting take on it. I really hope that comes through in the movie.

Edit: Also, you can love a book and still criticise it, dislike aspects of it or get annoyed by characters in it. I don’t like this scene much, but my ‘claim’ about loving the book isn’t any less valid. Plus, people can change their minds. So, yeah, keep that in mind.

Reblog if it’s okay to befriend you, ask questions, ask for advice or just have a nice chat.

(via herondhale)


I would say, you can be whoever you want to be, do whatever you want to do, and don’t be afraid to rely on your friends. Talk to people about things, you know? Whatever’s on your mind. A lot of people feel the need to store it deep down inside. You can trust your friends and family, but it is about feeling comfortable with who you are as well. I think that’s big.

(via herondhale)



(via haymitcth)



Katniss is now in the lead! Let’s keep her at #1 by tweeting #VOTEKATNISS

Katniss is now in the lead! Let’s keep her at #1 by tweeting #VOTEKATNISS

(via jenniferlawrencedaily)



“I’m a warrior, I was brought up as a warrior. I didn’t have toys, I had weapons. I slept with a wooden sword until I was five. My first books were medieval demonologies with illuminated pages. The first songs I learned were chants to banish demons. I know what brings me peace, and it isn’t sandy beaches or chirping birds in rainforests. I want a weapon in my hand and a strategy to win.”

I’m a warrior, I was brought up as a warrior. I didn’t have toys, I had weapons. I slept with a wooden sword until I was five. My first books were medieval demonologies with illuminated pages. The first songs I learned were chants to banish demons. I know what brings me peace, and it isn’t sandy beaches or chirping birds in rainforests. I want a weapon in my hand and a strategy to win.”

(via nephilimdaily)


Congrats Ross Lynch on your second Kid’s Choice Awards win for Favorite TV Actor!